Infants whose mothers have taken SSRI antidepressants are more likely to have decreased birth weight, gestational length

Source: Infants whose mothers have taken SSRI antidepressants are more likely to have decreased birth weight, gestational length

A new study, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, has found that prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has a significant association with lower birth weight and gestational length. This was found to be in cases where mothers had taken the drug for two or more trimesters.

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Source: Google Translate

Many parents believe it is useful to let your baby mourn. The popular wisdom says that a few minutes of crying do not harm but help him calm down and get sleep.

This is the technique of progressive expected , which was developed by Dr. Richard Ferber, neurologist and pediatrician at Harvard University at Children ‘s Hospital Boston (USA) , which is still used today worldwide.

Almost no one really knows what happens when babies keep crying, but the physical and psychological consequences could affect his whole life.

When a baby cries without their parents consoled increases your stress level because, through her tears, wants to express something , either hunger, pain or even need company. The child is totally dependent on them.

If parents ignore their calls, your body will produce stress hormones and, eventually, this may damage your central nervous system , as well as their growth and learning ability.

In an interview for the German newspaper Sueddeutsche Zeitung , Karl Heinrich Brisch, chief of psychosomatic medicine at Children ‘s Hospital of the University of Munich, explained that babies who leave mourn “quickly learn to activate an emergency program in its brain, similar to the reflex action of the tanatosis observed in some animals who see their lives threatened, and that is to simulate death. “ This affects brain development, so children do not learn to adapt to stress.

A third of British mums with postnatal depression are ‘too scared’ to seek help 

Source: A third of British mums with postnatal depression are ‘too scared’ to seek help 

Mumsnet CEO Justine Roberts said: “The stigma associated with mental health concerns is widely acknowledged, but it’s particularly concerning that some mothers avoid seeking medical help because of fears that official flags might be raised about their parenting ability.

Children Who Experience Early Childhood Trauma Do Not ‘Just Get Over It’

Children Who Experience Early Childhood Trauma Do Not ‘Just Get Over It’.

“If a baby is repeatedly scared and emotionally overwhelmed and they do not get their survival brain soothed, so they can cope, they begin to develop a brain and bodily system which is on hyper alert and the World seems to be a scary place. Sadly, this not something they can ‘just grow out of’. Far from it as what neuroscience is showing us from all the recent findings. An early experience has a profound effect on the way in which a child’s brain forms and operates as the survival brain is on over drive and senses threat everywhere so works too hard, too often, for too long.”

Shaping the connection

Shaping the connection.

“As several years-long research studies now show, children who grow up with a warm, stable connection to their parents (or other caregivers) are primed to form the same kind of connection later on, whereas those who start with uncertain or anxious bonds often struggle to forge close relationships as adults, even with their own children.”

Dangers of “Crying It Out”

Dangers of “Crying It Out”.

With neuroscience, we can confirm what our ancestors took for granted—that letting babies get distressed is a practice that can damage children and their relational capacities in many ways for the long term. We know now that leaving babies to cry is a good way to make a less intelligent, less healthy but more anxious, uncooperative and alienated persons who can pass the same or worse traits on to the next generation.

Childhood Trauma Leads to Brains Wired for Fear

Traumatic Childhood Events Can Lead to Mental Health and Behavioral Problems Later in Life

A report by the University of San Diego School of Law found that about 686,000 children were victims of abuse and neglect in 2013. Traumatic childhood events can lead to mental health and behavioral problems later in life, explains psychiatrist and traumatic stress expert Bessel van der Kolk, author of the recently published book, The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma. Children’s brains are literally shaped by traumatic experiences, which can lead to problems with anger, addiction, and even criminal activity in adulthood, says van der Kolk. Sound Medicine’s Barbara Lewis spoke with him about his book.

Sound Medicine (SM): Can psychologically traumatic events change the physical structure of the brain?

Dr. Bessel van der Kolk (BK): Yes, they can change the connections and activations in the brain. They shape the brain.

The human brain is a social organ that is shaped by experience, and that is shaped in order to respond to the experience that you’re having. So particularly earlier in life, if you’re in a constant state of terror; your brain is shaped to be on alert for danger, and to try to make those terrible feelings go away.

The brain gets very confused. And that leads to problems with excessive anger, excessive shutting down, and doing things like taking drugs to make yourself feel better. These things are almost always the result of having a brain that is set to feel in danger and fear.

As you grow up and get a more stable brain, these early traumatic events can still cause changes that make you hyper-alert to danger, and hypo-alert to the pleasures of everyday life.

SM: So are you saying that a child’s brain is much more malleable than an adult’s brain?

BK: A child’s brain is virtually nonexistent. It’s being shaped by experience. So yes, it’s extremely malleable.

SM: What is the mechanism by which traumatic events change the brain?

BK: The brain is formed by feedback from the environment. It’s a profoundly relational part of our body.

In a healthy developmental environment, your brain gets to feel a sense of pleasure, engagement, and exploration. Your brain opens up to learn, to see things, to accumulate information, to form friendships.

But if you’re in an orphanage for example, and you’re not touched or seen, whole parts of your brain barely develop; and so you become an adult who is out of it, who cannot connect with other people, who cannot feel a sense of self, a sense of pleasure. If you run into nothing but danger and fear, your brain gets stuck on just protecting itself from danger and fear.

SM: Does trauma have a very different effect on children compared to adults?

BK: Yes, because of developmental issues. If you’re an adult and life’s been good to you, and then something bad happens, that sort of injures a little piece of the whole structure. But toxic stress in childhood from abandonment or chronic violence has pervasive effects on the capacity to pay attention, to learn, to see where other people are coming from, and it really creates havoc with the whole social environment.

And it leads to criminality, and drug addiction, and chronic illness, and people going to prison, and repetition of the trauma on the next generation.

SM: Are there effective solutions to childhood trauma?

BK: It is difficult to deal with but not impossible. One thing we can do — which is not all that well explored because there hasn’t been that much funding for it — is neurofeedback, where you can actually help people to rewire the wiring of their brain structures.

Another method is putting people into safe environments and helping them to create a sense of safety inside themselves. And for that you can go to simple things like holding and rocking.

We just did a study on yoga for people with PTSD. We found that yoga was more effective than any medicine that people have studied up to now. That doesn’t mean that yoga cures it, but yoga makes a substantial difference in the right direction.

SM: What is it about yoga that helps?

BK: It’s about becoming safe to feel what you feel. When you’re traumatized you’re afraid of what you’re feeling, because your feeling is always terror, or fear or helplessness.  I think these body-based techniques help you to feel what’s happening in your body, and to breathe into it and not run away from it. So you learn to befriend your experience.

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study Pyramid

ace_pyramid_home

The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study is one of the largest investigations ever conducted to assess associations between childhood maltreatment and later-life health and well-being. The study is a collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Kaiser Permanente’s Health Appraisal Clinic in San Diego. Adverse Childhood Experiences can include physical, mental, emotional abuse and/or neglect, even at the level of infants and toddlers. Being devalued, ignored, screamed at, shaken, hit, neglected and worse all are contained in ACE.

More than 17, 000 Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) members undergoing a comprehensive physical examination chose to provide detailed information about their childhood experience of abuse, neglect, and family dysfunction. To date, more than 50 scientific articles have been published and more than100 conference and workshop presentations have been made.

The ACE Study findings suggest that traumatic experiences are major risk factors for the leading causes of illness and death as well as poor quality of life in the United States. It is critical to understand how some of the worst health and social problems in our nation can arise as a consequence of adverse childhood experiences. Realizing these connections is likely to improve efforts towards prevention and recovery.