INFANT MASSAGE: A HANDBOOK FOR LOVING PARENTS – NEW EDITION!

I am happy to announce that the new updated, expanded edition of Infant Massage: a Handbook for Loving Parents has been released by Random House. It is available on Amazon.com and from most bookstores.

CHAPTERS:

  1. Why Massage Your Baby?

  2. Your Baby’s Sensory World

  3. The Importance of Skin Stimulation

  4. Stress and Relaxation

  5. Bonding, Attachment, and Infant Massage

  6. The Elements of Bonding

  7. Attachment and the Benefits of Infant Massage

  8. Especially for Fathers

  9. Helping your Baby (and you) Learn to Relax

  10. Your Baby’s Brain

  11. Music and Massage

  12. Getting Ready

  13. How to Massage Your Baby

  14. Crying, Fussing, and Other Baby Language (including cues, reflexes and behavioral states

  15. Minor Illness and Colic

  16. Your Premature Baby

  17. Your Baby with Special Needs

  18. Your Growing Child and Sibling Bonding through Infant Massage

  19. Your Adopted or Foster Children

  20. A Note to Teen Parents

BACK MATTER INCLUDES:

References and Recommendations

Resources

Author Bio

Breast milk hormones found to impact bacterial development in infants’ guts: Intestinal microbiome of children born to obese mothers significantly different from those born to mothers of healthy weight

Source: Breast milk hormones found to impact bacterial development in infants’ guts: Intestinal microbiome of children born to obese mothers significantly different from those born to mothers of healthy weight

A new University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus study finds that hormones in breast milk may impact the development of healthy bacteria in infants’ guts, potentially protecting them from intestinal inflammation, obesity and other diseases later in life.

Bonding With Your Baby

Bonding, the intense attachment that develops between you and your baby, is completely natural. And it’s probably one of the most pleasurable aspects of infant care.

Source: Bonding With Your Baby

Bonding is the intense attachment that develops between parents and their baby. It makes parents want to shower their baby with love and affection and to protect and care for their little one. Bonding gets parents up in the middle of the night to feed their hungry baby and makes them attentive to the baby’s wide range of cries.

Scientists are still learning a lot about bonding. They know that the strong ties between parents and their child provide the baby’s first model for intimate relationships and foster a sense of security and positive self-esteem. And parents’ responsiveness to an infant’s signals can affect the child’s social and cognitive development.

Google Translate

Source: Google Translate

My mom spoils me and my hippocampus grows

Published 01/18/2016 · Category Babies and Children

A study at the University of Washington concluded that children who received more support from their parents had a greater development of the brain region linked with memory and emotions.

By Pedro Lipcovich

My mom spoils me Research published today adds a strong argument for the notion that the brain structures, far from being only determined by biology, constitute the links established throughout life, beginning with early childhood. The study, conducted at the University of Washington, is called “the maternal support in early childhood predicts larger volumes of the hippocampus in school age” and was divided into two sections separated by several years. The first part consisted of an ingenious test to assess the degree of support that the mother or father could give children three to five years in an everyday situation. The second part consisted of applying those kids, and at school age, an MRI to measure the size of the hippocampus, linked to memory and emotion structure: it turned out, the guys who had better maternal support, that part brain had achieved greater weight and volume.

The work is published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, and is signed by a team from the Department of Psychiatry at the School of Medicine at Washington University in Saint Louis, led by Joan Luby. The first part of the test was made several years ago with boys who were between three and five years. In a research laboratory behavior, were tested in the company of a parent, usually the mother, the boy handed him a gift, wrapped in gift paper, but with the slogan wait eight minutes before opening; mother, meanwhile, had to complete a written questionnaire. The test sought to establish, according to predetermined standards, to what extent support the mother gave the boy in the situation, relatively stressful to wait before opening the gift. The fact that the mother had to turn a task, completing questionnaires, sought to reproduce the structure of an everyday situation in which the mother or caregiver the boy must perform tasks while addresses contain the anxieties of the child. The greater or lesser maternal support was recorded on a scale score, and what was established at that time was the correlation between lower maternal support and an increased risk of depression in children.

The second phase of the research was conducted on 92 children, when they were between 7 and 13 years and was to determine, using MRI, the size of a brain structure called the hippocampus. The result was that in the boys-in testing had shown the preescolar- receive sufficient maternal support, the size of the hippocampus was 10 percent higher than in children who had not received that support. The article notes that the hippocampus “is a central region for memory, emotion regulation and maturation of stress, key areas for healthy social adaptation.” The hippocampus is the only place in the brain in which over a lifetime develop new neurons (last Friday, Pagina / 12 reported on recent work by researchers at the Leloir Institute CONICET).

Joan Luby, director of research at the University of Washington, said that “for years, studies highlighted the importance of early care for the proper development of children, but generally limited to factors such as school performance: study it is the first to show an anatomical change in the brain in relation to the importance of early parental action. “

Mariela Terzaghi, head of Neurology Noel H. Sbarra Hospital of La Plata, said that this research “is part of a series of works that break with the idea of a unique genetic determination for the brain, making place to the influence of aspects between which it should also include the historical, social and cultural conditions of parenting. However, larger hippocampal not necessarily better function, and should not assume that issues explain the mind from brain locations. “

Sergio Rodriguez -coautor Crossings between psychoanalysis and neurobiology said the report from the University of Washington “concerning the logic of research on neurotic depression, where the decreasing depression coincides with increased activity in the hippocampus and the cingulate core brain “.

Three Core Concepts in Early Development

This video series depicts how advances in neuroscience, molecular biology, and genomics give us a better understanding of how early experiences are built into our bodies and brains.

Source: Three Core Concepts in Early Development

Serve and Return

Serve and return interactions shape brain architecture. When caregivers are responsive to children’s signals, they help them build critical skills.

Source: Serve and Return

Because responsive relationships are both expected and essential, their absence is a serious threat to a child’s development and well-being. Healthy brain architecture depends on a sturdy foundation built by appropriate input from a child’s senses and stable, responsive relationships with caring adults. If an adult’s responses to a child are unreliable, inappropriate, or simply absent, the developing architecture of the brain may be disrupted, and subsequent physical, mental, and emotional health may be impaired. The persistent absence of serve and return interaction acts as a “double whammy” for healthy development: not only does the brain not receive the positive stimulation it needs, but the body’s stress response is activated, flooding the developing brain with potentially harmful stress hormones.

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