INFANT MASSAGE: A HANDBOOK FOR LOVING PARENTS – NEW EDITION!

I am happy to announce that the new updated, expanded edition of Infant Massage: a Handbook for Loving Parents has been released by Random House. It is available on Amazon.com and from most bookstores.

CHAPTERS:

  1. Why Massage Your Baby?

  2. Your Baby’s Sensory World

  3. The Importance of Skin Stimulation

  4. Stress and Relaxation

  5. Bonding, Attachment, and Infant Massage

  6. The Elements of Bonding

  7. Attachment and the Benefits of Infant Massage

  8. Especially for Fathers

  9. Helping your Baby (and you) Learn to Relax

  10. Your Baby’s Brain

  11. Music and Massage

  12. Getting Ready

  13. How to Massage Your Baby

  14. Crying, Fussing, and Other Baby Language (including cues, reflexes and behavioral states

  15. Minor Illness and Colic

  16. Your Premature Baby

  17. Your Baby with Special Needs

  18. Your Growing Child and Sibling Bonding through Infant Massage

  19. Your Adopted or Foster Children

  20. A Note to Teen Parents

BACK MATTER INCLUDES:

References and Recommendations

Resources

Author Bio

Infants whose mothers have taken SSRI antidepressants are more likely to have decreased birth weight, gestational length

Source: Infants whose mothers have taken SSRI antidepressants are more likely to have decreased birth weight, gestational length

A new study, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, has found that prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has a significant association with lower birth weight and gestational length. This was found to be in cases where mothers had taken the drug for two or more trimesters.

Breast milk hormones found to impact bacterial development in infants’ guts: Intestinal microbiome of children born to obese mothers significantly different from those born to mothers of healthy weight

Source: Breast milk hormones found to impact bacterial development in infants’ guts: Intestinal microbiome of children born to obese mothers significantly different from those born to mothers of healthy weight

A new University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus study finds that hormones in breast milk may impact the development of healthy bacteria in infants’ guts, potentially protecting them from intestinal inflammation, obesity and other diseases later in life.

Preemies’ Brains Get Boost From Breast Milk

MRI scans found infants who drank more of it had more brain tissue, study found

Source: Preemies’ Brains Get Boost From Breast Milk

“The brains of babies born before their due dates usually are not fully developed,” explained senior investigator Dr. Cynthia Rogers, an assistant professor of child psychiatry at Washington University in St. Louis.

“But breast milk has been shown to be helpful in other areas of development, so we looked to see what effect it might have on the brain,” Rogers said in a university news release.

“With MRI scans, we found that babies fed more breast milk had larger brain volumes. This is important because several other studies have shown a correlation between brain volume and cognitive development,” she said.

Maternal singing during skin-to-skin contact benefits both preterm infants, mothers

Source: Maternal singing during skin-to-skin contact benefits both preterm infants, mothers

This is why we teach a lullaby to accompany infant massage (in the case of NICU, holding methods and “Resting Hands.”

Premature infants fed breast milk have better brain growth, study shows

The brains of premature infants fed a primary diet of breast milk grow faster than those who are fed formula, according to a small study at St. Louis Children’s Hospital.

Source: Premature infants fed breast milk have better brain growth, study shows

Babies whose diets included at least 50 percent breast milk from their own mothers or donors had more brain tissue by their expected due dates, brain scans showed. The 77 premature infants in the study had stayed in the hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit. They had all been born at least 10 weeks early.

Infants born prematurely may show less interest in others

Attention to other people is a fundamental role for social cognitive development in the early stages of life. However, infants born prematurely show a different attentional pattern.

Source: Infants born prematurely may show less interest in others

Attention to other people is a fundamental role for social cognitive development in the early stages of life. However, infants born prematurely show a different attentional pattern.

In a new study, a Kyoto University team found evidence that such babies are less interested in other people compared to infants born full-term, when tested at 6 and 12 months of age. This new study brings light to the links between premature birth, development of , and ultimately autism.

Recent studies illustrate that infants born prematurely are at more risk of autism.